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Affective state, stress, and Type A-personality as a function of gender and affective profiles
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Gothenburg. (Hälsopsykologi; Network for Empowerment and Well-being)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0991-9569
University of Gothenburg ; The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg. (Network for Empowerment and Well-being)
University of Gothenburg. (Network for Empowerment and Well-being)
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, Vol. 3, no 1, 51-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three studies were performed to examine positive and negative affect, stress and energy, and Type-A personality as a function of Gender and Affective profiles. In Study I, 304 university

students (152 male and 152 female), in Study II, 142 pupils at upper secondary school (95

male and 47 female) and in Study III, 166 pupils at upper secondary school (84 male and 82

female) completed self-report questionnaires pertaining to Positive affect and Negative affect

Scales (PANAS), stress and energy (SE), the Type A-personality scale and a Background and

Health questionnaire. The results indicated gender effects by which female participants

expressed a higher level of negative affect, stress and Type A-personality were found in all

three studies, as well as for energy in Study I. There were marked effects of Affective profiles

upon stress, energy and Type A-personality in all three studies. Regression analysis indicated

that Type A-personality could be predicted from a high level of Negative Affect (Study I, II

and III) as well as from high levels of stress (Study I and II). All three studies indicate a link

between negative affectivity, stress and Type A-personality with consequences for the

maladaptive behavioral patterns implying health hazards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 3, no 1, 51-64 p.
Keyword [en]
gender; affective profiles; Type-A personality; stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61195DOI: 10.5861/ijrsp.2013.450OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-61195DiVA: diva2:1080098
Available from: 2017-03-09 Created: 2017-03-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Schütz, EricaArcher, Trevor

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