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Peripheral resolution and contrast sensitivity: Effects of stimulus drift
Royal Institute of Technology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8365-0601
Royal Institute of Technology.
Royal Institute of Technology.
2017 (English)In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 133, 145-149 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Optimal temporal modulation of the stimulus can improve foveal contrast sensitivity. This studyevaluates the characteristics oftheperipheral spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity function in normal-sighted subjects.The purpose is to identify a temporal modulation that can potentially improve the remaining peripheral visual function in subjects with central visual field loss. High contrast resolution cut-off for grating stimuli with four temporal frequencies (0, 5, 10 and 15 Hz drift) was first evaluated in the 10° nasal visual field.Resolution contrast sensitivity for all temporal frequencies was then measured at four spatial frequencies between 0.5 cycles per degree (cpd) and the measured stationary cut-off. All measurements were performed with eccentric optical correction. Similar to foveal vision, peripheral contrast sensitivity is highest for a combination of low spatial frequency and 5 to 10 Hz drift. At higher spatial frequencies, there was a decrease in contrast sensitivity with 15 Hz drift.Despitethis decrease, the resolution cut-off did not vary largely between the different temporal frequencies tested. ​ Additional measurements of contrast sensitivity at 0.5 cpd and resolution cut-off for stationary (0 Hz) and 7.5 Hz stimuli performed at 10, 15, 20 and 25° in the nasal visual field also showed the same characteristics across eccentricities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 133, 145-149 p.
Keyword [en]
Contrast sensitivity, Drifting gratings, Peripheral vision, Spatial frequency, Temporal frequency
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Natural Science, Optometry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61277DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2017.02.002PubMedID: 28268102OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-61277DiVA: diva2:1080661
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4094
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2017-03-23

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf