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When ‘property cannot own property’: women’s lack of property rights in Cameroon
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Centre for Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4505-1683
2017 (English)In: African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2046-4770, E-ISSN 2046-4789, Vol. 6, no 1, 67-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most of Africa, women constitute the majority of small holder farmers. They are overwhelmingly involved in food production on land leased to them or acquired through family bonds or purchase. This paper examines how the institution of customary marriage connives with Cameroon's gender neutral statutory land tenure legislation to deprive women of access to land. Additionally, the bureaucratic land registration procedure, the gendering of the land tenure legislation, the skewing of the Land Consultative Board in men's favour and farmer/grazer conflicts further undermine women's land rights. To ensure women's collective wellbeing and socioeconomic progress, gender-sensitive, rather than gender-neutral policies are recommended.In most of Africa, women constitute the majority of small holder farmers. They are overwhelmingly involved in food production on land leased to them or acquired through family bonds or purchase. This paper examines how the institution of customary marriage connives with Cameroon's gender neutral statutory land tenure legislation to deprive women of access to land. Additionally, the bureaucratic land registration procedure, the gendering of the land tenure legislation, the skewing of the Land Consultative Board in men's favour and farmer/grazer conflicts further undermine women's land rights. To ensure women's collective wellbeing and socioeconomic progress, gender-sensitive, rather than gender-neutral policies are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 6, no 1, 67-85 p.
Keyword [en]
women's rights, land rights, small holder farming, farmer-grazer conflicts, gender, socio-economic development, female rights, property rights, Cameroon, farmers, grazers, customary marriage, land tenure legislation, grazing, gender-sensitive policies, gender-neutral policies
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Economy, Cultural Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61719DOI: 10.1504/AJESD.2017.10003657OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-61719DiVA: diva2:1084607
Conference
International Conference on Humanities and Social Sciences, Perspectives on Gender in a Global World: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, University of South-East Europe, Bucharest, Romania, 14–16 May 2015.
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2017-04-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf