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From hope to dystopia: Concurrent discourses of petro-dollar inspired-development in Chad
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Centre for Concurrences in Colonial and postcolonial Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4505-1683
Centre for Research in Anthropology and Human Sciences (CRASH), Chad.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Development Issues, ISSN 1446-8956, Vol. 15, no 1, 35-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the dark flip side of the heightened dreams and wild expectations of development as a bright picture that accompanied the discovery of petroleum in politically unstable and donor-dependent Chad.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were elicited through local-level ethnography–participant observation, individual surveys and focus group discussion sessions with stakeholders on the impact of the Chad–Cameroon pipeline and petroleum development project.

Findings

While the “discourse of development” is about a better and new future, this new future, however, has a dark side: un/under-development, “backwardness”, corruption and patronage, leading to deeply entrenched poverty. Petroleum has become a discursive site where the competing discourses about development personified as the provision of material resources are played out.

Originality/value

The failure of petro-dollar-inspired development in Chad speaks to the mutually reinforcing nature of development decisions. Although firms need workers with specialized skills, workers will not acquire those skills in anticipation of employment opportunities. This disjuncture highlights the need for strategic complementarity in investment decision and coordination among economic agents. More than a decade later, the utopic dream of petro-dollar-inspired development as an aspiration is now characterized by a disconnect–environmental degradation, food insecurity, gendered and deeply entrenched poverty. This disjuncture demonstrates the need for a holistic impact assessment that involves different adaptive approaches and focus on a wide range of livelihood issues. Holistic evaluation on all programmes, plans, projects, policies and interventions will lead to the achievement of sustainable people-centred development that conserves the stewardship of nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016. Vol. 15, no 1, 35-50 p.
Keyword [en]
Resource curse, Capitalism, Un/under-development, Petroleum exploitation, Petro-dollars
National Category
Sociology Human Geography
Research subject
Humanities, Cultural Sociology; Environmental Science, Natural Resources Management; Humanities, Human Geography; Social Sciences; Social Sciences, Peace and Development Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61724DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-09-2015-0056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-61724DiVA: diva2:1084621
Available from: 2017-03-26 Created: 2017-03-26 Last updated: 2017-04-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf