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Whither Europe?: Postcolonial versus Neocolonial Cosmopolitanism
University of Warwick, UK. (Concurrences)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3658-1575
2016 (English)In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 18, no 2, 187-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The financial collapse of 2008, and its consequences of recession in the Eurozone and beyond, has exacerbated tensions at the heart of the postwar European project. The politics of austerity has provoked populist and far-right political responses, scapegoating migrants and minorities and increasingly calling the project of integration into question. In this essay I focus on responses by social theorists to the emerging crisis. In particular, I address the contrast between their reaffirmation of ‘European’ cosmopolitanism and their associated criticisms of multiculturalism, which, instead, is posed as a threat. In this way, while they challenge those who wish the dissolution of the European project, they do so at the expense of those seen to be internal ‘others’, whose scapegoating is one aspect of the populist threat to that integration. It is their failure to address the colonial histories of Europe, I argue, that enables them to dismiss so easily its postcolonial and multicultural present. As such, they reproduce features of the populist political debates they otherwise seek to criticize and transcend. A properly cosmopolitan Europe, I suggest, would be one which understood that its historical constitution in colonialism cannot be rendered to the past by denial of that past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 18, no 2, 187-202 p.
Keyword [en]
Colonialism, cosmopolitanism, European Union, historiography, multiculturalism, postcolonialism
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62034DOI: 10.1080/1369801X.2015.1106964OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-62034DiVA: diva2:1086291
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved

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Bhambra, Gurminder K.
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf