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Partner relationship, social support and perinatal distress among pregnant Icelandic women
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Akureyri, Iceland.
University of Iceland, Iceland.
Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland ; University of Iceland, Iceland.
University of Iceland, Iceland.
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2017 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 1, p. e46-e55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: It is inferred that perinatal distress has adverse effects on the prospective mother and the health of the foetus/infant. More knowledge is needed to identify which symptoms of perinatal distress should be assessed during pregnancy and to shed light on the impact of women's satisfaction with their partner relationship on perinatal distress.

AIM: The current study aimed to generate knowledge about the association of the partner relationship and social support when women are dealing with perinatal distress expressed by symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

METHODS: A structured interview was conducted with 562 Icelandic women who were screened three times during pregnancy with the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Of these, 360 had symptoms of distress and 202 belonged to a non-distress group. The women answered the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. The study had a multicentre prospective design allowing for exploration of association with perinatal distress.

FINDINGS: Women who were dissatisfied in their partner relationship were four times more likely to experience perinatal distress. Women with perinatal distress scored highest on the DASS Stress Subscale and the second highest scores were found on the Anxiety Subscale.

CONCLUSION: Satisfaction in partner relationship is related to perinatal distress and needs to be assessed when health care professionals take care of distressed pregnant women, her partner and her family. Assessment of stress and anxiety should be included in the evaluation of perinatal distress, along with symptoms of depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 30, no 1, p. e46-e55
Keywords [en]
Iceland, Midwives, Partner relationship, Perinatal distress, Social support
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-62222DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.08.005ISI: 000397042900018PubMedID: 27616767Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85002813999OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-62222DiVA, id: diva2:1088550
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of perinatal distress, satisfaction in partner relationship and social support on pregnancy and outcome of childbirth
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of perinatal distress, satisfaction in partner relationship and social support on pregnancy and outcome of childbirth
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this thesis was to achieve a deeper understanding of the situation among women experiencing perinatal distress during pregnancy and childbirth and the effects that dissatisfaction in partner relationship and weak social support from family and friends could have on pregnancy and childbirth.

Methods: Following screening for perinatal distress, 562 expecting mothers came for a semi-structured interview. This screening, done with the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale, categorized 360 (64.1%) women into the perinatal distressed group (PDG) and 202 (35.9%) into the non-distressed group (NDG). During the interview women answered the Dyadic Adjustment Scale and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Data were collected with these instruments for study I. Additional data for the three other studies were gathered from the women´s pregnancy records (II), electronic medical records (II, III), and childbirth records (IV). Results of the four studies were obtained by using descriptive statistics; parametric and nonparametric statistics and regression modeling.

Results: Women in the PDG were significantly more likely than the NDG to be dissatisfied in their partner relationship, continue smoking during pregnancy, be dissatisfied with division of household tasks and child-rearing, have elementary or lower education, and to be students or unemployed. They were also significantly more likely to experience fatigue, vomiting and pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. Women in the PDG who received weak family support reported nausea and heartburn more frequently than those with strong family support. Women in the PDG utilized more antenatal care service and were allocated more part time as well as earlier sick leaves during pregnancy, than those in the NDG. Women in the PDG were significantly more likely to use epidural anesthesia as a single pain management during labor.

Conclusion: Perinatal distress affects pregnancy and childbirth. It is more common among women who are dissatisfied in their partner relationship and with the division of household tasks and child-rearing. Perception of weak social support also affects pregnancy among distressed women. Distressed women along with their partners and families should be offered support and consultation to relieve distress and strengthen their bonds during pregnancy and childbirth.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2019. p. 84
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 352
Keywords
perinatal distress, partner relationship, social support, pregnancy, sick leave certificates, childbirth, midwifery, self-reported scales, DASS, EPDS, DAS, MSPSS
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82697 (URN)978-91-88898-61-6 (ISBN)978-91-88898-60-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-05-29, Lapis, Vi1158, Hus Vita, Kalmar, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved

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Jonsdottir, Sigridur SiaSwahnberg, Katarina

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