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Predictors of survival in the Swedish 60 to 96 years old population
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6532-3877
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl 1, ckw166.004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Longevity is multi-determined. In this study, biological, social and psychological factors were included in a multivariate model in order to investigate their predictive ability of survival in a nine year follow up period.

Methods

The sample was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC), including a representative database of Swedish inhabitants aged 60 to 96 years. The participants (N = 6986) were followed during the years 2002 to 2011. Data was collected including age, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), muscle strength, living alone or not, household economy, functional status, smoking habits and education. These variables were used as predictors in multiple logistic regression analyses in order to estimate the odds ratios of survival during the follow up period.

Results

During the nine year period, 4447 participants (64%) survived. Education was the strongest predictor of survival with 57% higher odds to survive for higher educated participants (P<.001. 95%CI = 1.38 – 1.78), followed by not living alone, which increased the odds of survival with 37% (P<.001. 95%CI = .65 - .83). Light physical activity increased the odds of survival with 18% (P<.001. 95%CI = 1.12 – 1.24) and not smoking was significant related to survival but the odds ratio was as low as 10% (P<.01. 95%CI = 1.03 – 1.71).

Conclusions

Social aspects such as education and not living alone are strong predictors of survival in older populations and must be considered in the understanding of differences in longevity. In addition, life habits such as physical activity and smoking behaviors should be taken into account.

Key message:

  • Both social and behavioral factors contribute to the understanding of differences in longevity in the Swedish population of 60 to 96 years old people in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016. Vol. 26, no Suppl 1, ckw166.004
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64259DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw166.004ISI: 000398600401025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-64259DiVA: diva2:1098011
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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