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Global Fish Trade, Prices, and Food Security in an African Coral Reef Fishery
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Wildlife Conservat Soc Coral Reef Conservat Proje, Kenya ; Pwani University, Kenya..
Wildlife Conservat Soc, USA.
2017 (English)In: Coastal Management, ISSN 0892-0753, E-ISSN 1521-0421, Vol. 45, no 2, 143-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study evaluated the potential impact of global fish trade on local food prices by analyzing a 16-year locally collected time series of disaggregated coral reef fish products and prices that differed in their market chain linkages-ranging from local to international markets. We were primarily interested in evaluating how local and global markets interacted with the local prices of beef, fish, and maize. There was no cointegration between the prices of exported octopus and that of maize and beef over this study period. Further, the three types of fish and associated markets responded in different ways to various price changes. For internationally traded octopus, we found a positive association between price and catch rates but no evidence that the global trade in octopus markets created local inflation, particularly the prices of the fish eaten by the poor. In general, there was no evidence for price transmission from export to nonexport fish products even though fishers appeared to focus on octopus when prices were high. Consequently, fishers' behaviors and trade policies that promote adjusting fishing effort to internationally traded fish did not appear to promote poverty or food insecurity in this fishery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017. Vol. 45, no 2, 143-160 p.
Keyword [en]
fishing behavior, Indian Ocean, informal trade, international trade and markets, Kenya, macroeconomics
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64241DOI: 10.1080/08920753.2017.1278146ISI: 000398042900004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-64241DiVA: diva2:1098028
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf