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Corporate social marketing in tourism: to sleep or not to sleep with the enemy?
North West Univ, South Africa ; Natl Econ Univ, Vietnam.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand ; Univ Oulu, Finland ; Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
2017 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 25, no 7, 884-902 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social marketing is regarded as an effective consumer-oriented approach to promoting behavioural change and improved well-being for individuals, communities and society. However, its potential for tourism, especially sustainable tourism, remains under-researched. This article examines the utilisation of social marketing by tourism businesses. A search strategy identified 14 behavioural change programmes that involved tourism businesses. Half of these programmes label themselves social marketing; the others tend to be part of corporate social responsibility efforts, using a form of corporate social marketing (CSM). Most programmes seek to encourage pro-environmental behaviours in tourists, tourism businesses and other stakeholders including suppliers. Although tourism businesses can develop social marketing programmes alone, typically they collaborate with public and non-profit agencies as partners and sponsors. The strength of the tie between the promoted behaviour and the sale of a company's product varies considerably. It is suggested that social marketing can make significant contributions to environmentally sustainable tourism. However, this research also suggests that social marketing is not a substitute for, but rather an essential complement to, technological and regulatory approaches to climate change. Changing behaviour is a long process: without a long-term commitment from private sector companies, CSM programmes will fail to achieve behavioural change goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 25, no 7, 884-902 p.
Keyword [en]
Behavioural change, corporate social marketing, corporate social responsibility, public-private partnership, social marketing campaigns, sustainable consumption
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67012DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2016.1201093ISI: 000401063900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67012DiVA: diva2:1127672
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2017-07-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf