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Ethical controversies in the process of formulating new national guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Sweden
Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås. (iCARE)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7865-3480
Uppsala University.
Örebro University.
2017 (English)In: Clinical Ethics, ISSN 1477-7509, E-ISSN 1758-101XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Delegation for Medical Ethics within the Swedish Society of Medicine has taken the initiative to create national ethical guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The reasons behind this initiative were indications of differences in the way decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation were made and documented and requests expressed by health- care professionals for new national ethical guidelines. During the process of creating the guidelines, a number of work- shops were held with representatives from the delegation and clinical experts from various branches of medicine. Several versions of the working document were sent to consultation bodies with requests for comments. We therefore believe that the final guidelines are well supported by the medical profession in Sweden. The purpose of this article is to present ethical issues on which it was difficult to reach consensus due to divergent opinions expressed by the people and organisations involved. The arguments for and against a particular point of view or wording in the text are presented. The main controversies were related to the following six issues; Determining whether or not cardiopulmonary resus- citation is beneficial for the patient – The presence of close loved ones during cardiopulmonary resuscitation – Performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the benefit of people other than the patient – Ambulance personnel’s mandate to decide not to initiate and to terminate cardiopulmonary resuscitation outside hospital – Limiting the length and content of cardiopulmonary resuscitation – Whether or not to specify a week of gestation before which cardio- pulmonary resuscitation should not be started. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017.
Keyword [en]
Clinical ethics, Advance directives, Informed consent, Professional ethics in medicine
National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67305DOI: 10.1177/1477750917724331OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67305DiVA: diva2:1134461
Available from: 2017-08-20 Created: 2017-08-20 Last updated: 2017-08-22

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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