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Reduced susceptibility of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to reactive nitrogen species promotes survival in activated macrophages
Linköping University.
Linköping University.
Linköping University ; Karolinska Institutet.
Linköping University.
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2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 7, e0181221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Drugs such as isoniazid (INH) and pretomanid (PRT), used against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are active partly through generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The aim of this study was to explore variability in intracellular susceptibility to nitric oxide (NO) in clinical strains of M. tuberculosis. Method Luciferase-expressing clinical M. tuberculosis strains with or without INH resistance were exposed to RNS donors (DETA/NO and SIN-1) in broth cultures and bacterial survival was analysed by luminometry. NO-dependent intracellular killing in a selection of strains was assessed in interferon gamma/lipopolysaccharide-activated murine macrophages using the NO inhibitor L-NMMA. Results When M. tuberculosis H37Rv was compared to six clinical isolates and CDC1551, three isolates with inhA mediated INH resistance showed significantly reduced NO-susceptibility in broth culture. All strains showed a variable but dose-dependent susceptibility to RNS donors. Two clinical isolates with increased susceptibility to NO exposure in broth compared to H37Rv were significantly inhibited by activated macrophages whereas there was no effect on growth inhibition when activated macrophages were infected by clinical strains with higher survival to NO exposure in broth. Furthermore, the most NO-tolerant clinical isolate showed increased resistance to PRT both in broth culture and the macrophage model compared to H37Rv in the absence of mutational resistance in genes associated to reduced susceptibility against PRT or NO. Conclusion In a limited number of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates we found a significant difference in susceptibility to NO between clinical isolates, both in broth cultures and in macrophages. Our results indicate that mycobacterial susceptibility to cellular host defence mechanisms such as NO need to be taken into consideration when designing new therapeutic strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 12, no 7, e0181221
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67401DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181221ISI: 000405649700109OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67401DiVA: diva2:1135899
Available from: 2017-08-24 Created: 2017-08-24 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved

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Woksepp, Hanna
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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