lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Exploring curriculum change using discursive institutionalism: methodological considerations
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy. (Linnaeus-SITE)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8503-2655
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. (Linnaeus-SITE)
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The question of what drives curriculum change has for decades been an issue among educational scholars working in the field of curriculum theory (CT). Due to the globalisation of the curriculum field (cf. Andersson-Levitt, 2008), issues of how to address, understand and explain the role of transnational forces and actors as drivers of change have become central to the field (Nordin & Sundberg, 2014). As a result of this ’transnational turn’ it is necessary for scholars in the field of curriculum studies to reinvent their analytical tools (cf. Young, 2013; Deng, 2015) in order to be able to analyse curriculum-making as a complex and multi-layered practise taking place in a complex interplay between transnational, national as well as local arenas and a diversity of endogenous and exogenous forces and determinants. In response to this expressed need for scholars working in the field of CT to reinvent their analytical tools (cf. Deng, 2015) the aim of this article is to turn to discourse-institutionalism (DI) developed by Vivien Schmidt (2008, 2010, 2011, 2016) in order to examine its methodological potential and to develop an analytical framework for analysing curriculum change in the light of the ‘transnational turn’ within CT. We make use of Schmidt´s distinction between a coordinative and a communicative policy discourse. Somewhat simplified the coordinative discourse refers to the interaction among different kinds of policy elites while the communicative discourse refers to the interaction between these elites and the public. Furthermore, we make use of Schmidt’s stratified understanding of ideas at different policy levels, from philosophical ideas that are very stable over time, to programmatic ideas that changes somewhat easier to policy ideas who can change rapidly in order to capture the transformation of ideas travelling between different arenas and used by different actors. The different kinds of ideas we relate to the five different categories arenas (where?), actors (who?), content (what?), language (how?) and legitimation (why?). Combining these different categories facilitates a coherent analysis of curriculum change as simultaneously content and discursive interaction between different policy actors at different policy levels. Ongoing research on the most recent Swedish curriculum reform, Lgr 11 is used to provide empirical illustrations of how the framework and its concepts can be used for theoretical analyses and methodological designs especially focusing travelling curriculum policies on ‘competencies’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67442OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67442DiVA: diva2:1136232
Conference
ECER
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2017-08-26

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nordin, Andreas
By organisation
Department of pedagogyDepartment of Education
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 30 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf