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The Open Data Movement in the Age of Big Data Capitalism
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Westminster, UK ; Lund University. (Biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4232-0128
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The digital world has transformed the conditions for discussing freedom within liberalism. Private property more obviously clashes with the freedom of speech (the public sphere), when the costs of mediated and reproduced art, journalism, information and literature nears zero and the exchange of these takes fluid forms, similar to social communication. The concept of “open”, similar but still opposite to “free”, has taken on an accentuated ideological importance in this context, but so have also alternative visions of intellectual commons. This article contains a case study of Open Knowledge Network’s perspective on openness’ relation to private property and capitalism in the informational field. It does so first through an analysis of the network’s understanding of the copyleft principle, and second through an analysis of the organisation’s view on open business models. A theoretical reading of classical political perspectives on the concept of freedom supports the analysis. One result is the identification of a central ideological lacuna in absent discussions of unconditionally opened-up resources that strengthen the accumulation cycle of capital. This logic favours the negative freedom of closed business models in the competition with open ones that could foster more positive notions of freedom, although open business models are generally advocated and commons are mentioned as desirable. In a dominant ideological formation, openness is used to promote its opposite in the economic field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Westminster Institute for Advanced Studies (WIAS), University of Westminster , 2017. , p. 41
Series
Westminster Advanced Studies, ISSN 2397-5814 ; 7
Keywords [en]
Open data, Big data, Liberalism, Free, Open, Freedom, Openness, Ideology, Licenses, Copyright
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Library and Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67485OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67485DiVA, id: diva2:1136657
Projects
WIAS International Research Fellowship Programme 2016/2017Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2018-04-12Bibliographically approved

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Lund, Arwid

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf