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Conclusion: prospects for tourism in Asia
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Canterbury, New Zealand ; Oulu University, Finland ; University of Johannesburg, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
Bournemouth University, UK.
2016 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of Tourism in Asia / [ed] C. Michael Hall & Stephen J. Page, Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 375-386Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The chapters contained in this book are by no means a complete assessment of tourism in Asia. Arguably the tendency in much Western tourism literature when discussing tourism in Asia has been to focus on east and southeast Asia and ASEAN member countries and to neglect south Asia (Hall & Page 2000a). Yet, as the chapters within this book undeniably show, there are complex inter-relationships which exist in terms of the tourism markets, regions and activities within Southeast and South Asia. Importantly, the residents in neighbouring Asian countries are increasingly providing major tourism markets for each other. This is reflected in the complex web of airline and cruise routes that are intra-regional in nature, often short-haul or medium-haul cross-border trips. For example, the growth of the Indian and the Chinese middle class has had substantial implications for intraregional travel as well as intercontinental travel, which is where much Western business and academic research is focused. What is also often overlooked is the extremely important domestic tourism market in Asian countries (see Singh 2009 for an important exception). In one sense of course this is understandable when framed in terms of the importance given to the attraction of foreign exchange by many governments in the region, and which is therefore also reflective of a number of chapters in the present volume. Nevertheless, it is also worth noting that despite most national tourism organisations' emphasising inbound tourism due to balance of trade and investment benefits, in some cases (e.g. Sri Lanka and Malaysia), tourism authorities have also tried to use domestic tourism as a substitute for a decline in international visitor arrivals, especially during periods of economic and financial crisis (Lew & Hall 1999; Hall 2010).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016, 1. p. 375-386
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Economics and Business
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URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67690DOI: 10.4324/9781315768250.ch28Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85027730267ISBN: 9781317665892 (electronic)ISBN: 9781138784581 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67690DiVA, id: diva2:1138161
Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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