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Teachers use and views of visual representations when teaching chemical bonding
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Chemistry is typically experienced as difficult to make meaning of. One of the primary reasons is that many aspects of chemistry fall into the micro domain, which creates a distancing from the students experienced world. Visual representations are often used in order to visualize the imperceptible micro level, which makes visual representations important communication tools when experts, teachers or students endeavour to share chemical knowledge. However, the use of these representations still leave many students without the desired understanding, often because the students are not immediately able to experience the disciplinary affordance of a representation in the way that teachers assume they will. Therefore, it is critical that teachers reflect on which representations they use and how they present them when helping students to make meaning of chemistry. Otherwise, some of these visual representations could hamper the learning possibilities, rather than enhancing them.

In the context of teaching chemical bonding, we report on an investigation into how upper secondary school teachers use visual representations to share chemistry knowledge and their reasons for doing so. The data collection consisted of observations of three chemistry teachers’ lessons of intermolecular bonding in conjunction with semi-structured interviews with the participating teachers. The interviews were conducted after the observed lessons and still-photos of the representations used in the lessons were employed in order to create a stimulated recall environment. The data is analysed using a constant comparative method. The preliminary results show that the teachers feel that visual representations are important teaching resources and they use them extensively. The teachers’ reflective knowledge about the impact that visual representations could have on students’ learning varies, which both could hamper and enhance possibilities of learning about chemical bonding.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki, 2015.
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-68022DiVA: diva2:1142467
Conference
ESERA
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-09-19

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf