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Burnout in Palliative Care Settings Compared With Other Settings: A Systematic Review
Univ Porto, Portugal ; Nursing Sch Coimbra, Portugal.
Univ Porto, Portugal ; Nursing Sch Coimbra, Portugal.
Nursing Sch Coimbra, Portugal.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. (Ctr Collaborat Palliat Care)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3155-575x
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 19, no 5, 442-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A systematic review, using the guideline of the Joanna Briggs Institute, was conducted to explore the effect of working in palliative care settings, compared with other settings, on burnout among health care professionals. Multiple databases were searched-CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, and SciELOV-as well as gray literature for studies published since 1975 that compared health professionals caring for patients older than 18 years in specialized palliative care settings (palliative care units, home care, or hospices) with health professionals working in other settings. Of the 539 studies retrieved, 7 cross-sectional studies were included in this review. Of these, six were conducted with nurses, and six used the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Working in palliative care (palliative care unit or hospices) was associated with lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, as well as higher levels of personal accomplishment, compared with working in other settings. Evidence indicates that burnout levels seem to be lower among professionals working in palliative care compared with professionals working in other settings. Further research is needed to explore the strategies used by nurses working in palliative care that help them deal with burnout and to apply these same strategies to professionals working in other settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017. Vol. 19, no 5, 442-451 p.
Keyword [en]
burnout, end-of-life care, hospice care, palliative care, systematic review
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68143DOI: 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000370ISI: 000410653200007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-68143DiVA: diva2:1146242
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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