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Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Delhi Technol Univ, India.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5889-7792
2017 (English)In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 35, no 7, 867-888 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25 nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems andlab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 35, no 7, 867-888 p.
Keyword [en]
Chemical engineering, Actin filament, Biomolecular motors, Nanofabrication, Self-assembly, Miniaturized sensing device
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Chemistry, Biochemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68547DOI: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2017.08.002ISI: 000412254600002PubMedID: 28830772OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-68547DiVA: diva2:1154210
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2017-11-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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