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The travelling reform agenda: the Swedish case through the lens of the OECD
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice. (Studies in Curriculum, Teaching and Evaluation (SITE))ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5554-6041
2018 (English)In: Transnational curriculum standards and classroom practices: The new meaning of teaching / [ed] Ninni Wahlström & Daniel Sundberg, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, the central theme is the consequences of an individual country turning to an intergovernmental organisation, the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), to have its school systems assessed by an authoritative educational policy actor. This analysis adheres to current comparative research policy borrowing and lending, where national policy-makers project their policy agendas into ‘international standards’ and international judgements to justify their own educational policy reform agenda. The assumption is that national policy-makers with lengthy conflicts in a policy field such as education are likely to turn their attention to another country’s educational system to legitimise their national policy; that is, they use another country as a ‘projection’ for their internal debates (Steiner-Khamsi, 2012; Takayama et al., 2013 ). In this case, the OECD instead uses its transnational policy as a ‘projection’ for a good and ‘evidence-based’ policy that is applied to a long-debated national school system. However, when a transnational reform agenda works as the lens through which an individual country’s school system is to be judged, it might be quite difficult to catch sight of the local/national school system. Instead, the transnational perspective tends to dominate and obscure the character of the national school system that is under the magnifying glass. In the present analysis, two different approaches are brought together in a common framework: curriculum theory (CT) and discursive institutionalism (DI).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018. p. 15-30
Keywords [en]
comparative studies, policy borrowing, Sweden; discursive institutionalism; curriculum theory
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69143ISBN: 978-1-138-08749-1 (print)ISBN: 9781315110424 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-69143DiVA, id: diva2:1164153
Projects
Understanding Curriculum Reforms - A Theory-Oriented Evaluation of the Swedish Curriculum Reform Lgr 11
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2218Available from: 2017-12-10 Created: 2017-12-10 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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