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What determines the decline of social movements? A qualitative case study of the Zapatista movement in southern Mexico
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Since the 1950s, the research field of social movements has caught the interest of many social scientists. The focus has mostly lied on the emergence of such movements and their early developments. There is surprisingly little research on the decline of social movements and the factors behind their weakening. This study aims to contribute to filling that research gap. The Zapatista movement in southern Mexico serves as a case study in this research, as it has been perceived to have declined since the first violent uprising in 1994. By using the method of process tracing, the Zapatista movement is explored and analysed in regard to the factors that might have contributed to its disappearance from the international spotlight. The analysis is based on two different social movement theories, the model of movement decline and the political process theory. The results of this study show that the theories used are revealing and relevant to understand the Zapatista movement, as their application on the case study provide several factors explaining the movement’s weakening. However, the analysis also shows the limits of the theories, as they were unable to explain some factors which led to the decline of the Zapatista movement. Recent news of the Zapatistas resurfacing further questions the previous assumptions about their decline. This study is part of an increasing attempt within social movement research to explain what happens in the final stages of a social movement. Through the examination of existing theory with a case study, this thesis contributes to the research field and hopes to incite future research within this topic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 44
Keywords [en]
Social movements, movement decline, Political Process Theory, Zapatista movement, Mexico
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69812OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-69812DiVA, id: diva2:1173658
Educational program
Peace and Development Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf