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Readers’ Perceptions of Gender, Use of Stereotypes and Identification with Literary Texts: Selected South African High School Students’ Responses on “A Rose for Emily”
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. pia.osterman@gmail.com.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Selected South African high school students’ perceptions of stereotypes in William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” are the center of attention in an attempt to establish or refute the existence of a uniform interpretation in the interpretive community. The textual reader responses were collected by using a questionnaire. The results show that the respondents use stereotypes to understand encounters with literary texts and as tools to connect the content of the text with their own experiences. The stereotypes also provide a framework for the readers to position themselves with or against the text and the depicted characters. Consequently, the female respondents are more inclined to distance themselves from sexist values than the male readers. Next to all the readers condemn racist values and racist language detectable in the text. Overall, the readers distance themselves from negative values and identify themselves with positive values. The results show that readers use a variety of stereotypes as aids to interpret the characters, events, values and structure of society in “A Rose for Emily”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 32
Keywords [en]
A Rose for Emily, identification, interpretive community, group formation, Norman Holland, reader response theory, reading event, stereotypes, gender stereotypes
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70239OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70239DiVA, id: diva2:1178502
External cooperation
SIDA
Subject / course
English
Educational program
Language, Culture and Communication Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved

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fulltext(667 kB)185 downloads
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf