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Anaerobic consortia of fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria in deep granite fractures
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7230-6509
Swedish Museum of Natural History.
Swedish Museum of Natural History.
Georg-August University, Germany.
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2017 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, p. 1-9, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deep biosphere is one of the least understood ecosystems on Earth. Although most microbiological studies in this system have focused on prokaryotes and neglected microeukaryotes, recent discoveries have revealed existence of fossil and active fungi in marine sediments and sub-seafloor basalts, with proposed importance for the subsurface energy cycle. However, studies of fungi in deep continental crystalline rocks are surprisingly few. Consequently, the characteristics and processes of fungi and fungus-prokaryote interactions in this vast environment remain enigmatic. Here we report the first findings of partly organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at great depth in fractured crystalline rock (−740 m). Based on environmental parameters and mineralogy the fungi are interpreted as anaerobic. Synchrotron-based techniques and stable isotope microanalysis confirm a coupling between the fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria. The cryptoendolithic fungi have significantly weathered neighboring zeolite crystals and thus have implications for storage of toxic wastes using zeolite barriers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 8, p. 1-9, article id 55
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70482DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00094-6ISI: 000444344000001PubMedID: 28676652OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70482DiVA, id: diva2:1180119
Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Drake, HenrikÅström, Mats E.

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