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Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments
University of Southern Denmark, Denmark;Swedish Museum of Natural History.
Swedish Museum of Natural History.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7230-6509
University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
2018 (English)In: Advances in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0065-2164, Vol. 102, p. 83-116Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The igneous crust of the oceans and the continents represents the major part of Earth's lithosphere and has recently been recognized as a substantial, yet underexplored, microbial habitat. While prokaryotes have been the focus of most investigations, microeukaryotes have been surprisingly neglected. However, recent work acknowledges eukaryotes, and in particular fungi, as common inhabitants of the deep biosphere, including the deep igneous provinces. The fossil record of the subseafloor igneous crust, and to some extent the continental bedrock, establishes fungi or fungus-like organisms as inhabitants of deep rock since at least the Paleoproterozoic, which challenges the present notion of early fungal evolution. Additionally, deep fungi have been shown to play an important ecological role engaging in symbiosis-like relationships with prokaryotes, decomposing organic matter, and being responsible for mineral weathering and formation, thus mediating mobilization of biogeochemically important elements. In this review, we aim at covering the abundance and diversity of fungi in the various igneous rock provinces on Earth as well as describing the ecological impact of deep fungi. We further discuss what consequences recent findings might have for the understanding of the fungal distribution in extensive anoxic environments and for early fungal evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 102, p. 83-116
Keywords [en]
Fungi, Deep biosphere, Igneous crust
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70484DOI: 10.1016/bs.aambs.2017.11.001ISI: 000436595200003PubMedID: 29680127OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70484DiVA, id: diva2:1180129
Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved

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Drake, Henrik

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