lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Language background affects word order processing in a second language online but not offline
Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6731-1522
Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5505-2279
Lund University. (Humanities Laboratory)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3589-9605
2014 (English)In: Culture, Brain, Learning : Wallenberg Network Initiative: Lund University, nov 19-24, 2014 / [ed] Maja Petersson, Lund: Lund University , 2014, p. 15-15Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Different languages organize information differently, for example in different word orders. A large body of work shows that learning to use word order in a new, second language (L2) is difficult. An example is the production of verb-second (V2) word order, which requires the finite verb in main clauses to appear in second position even when the sentence does not start with a subject. V2 difficulties are ubiquitous and only partially modulated by patterns in thefirst language (L1; e.g., Ganuza, 2008 for an overview). Despite the body of work on L2 production, we know surprisingly little about how word order is processed behaviorally and neurocognitively, and how production relates to comprehension. This study therefore examined how advanced German (n=14) and English (n=14) adult learners, matched for proficiency and age of acquisition, process word order in Swedish compared to native speakers (n=20) depending on L1 background (i.e., ±similar word order in the L1; German [+V2] vs. English [-V2]), sentence-initial adverb frequency (frequent idag ‘today’ vs. infrequent hemma ‘at home’ (1)), and length of the sentence-initial constituent (short vs. long prefield; (2)).

(1) Idag/Hemma läste hon tidningen. vs. *Idag/Hemma hon läste tidningen. Today/At home read she paper.def vs. *Today/At home she read paper.def

(2) Idag/Hemma hos Maria läste hon tidningen. vs. *Idag/Hemma hos Maria hon läste tidningen. Today/At home at Maria’s read she paper.def vs. *Today/At home at Maria’s she read paper.def.

We probed the production of word order in a sentence completion task and examined responses to word order (violations) in a timed acceptability judgment task during which participants were presented with sentences word by word while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. At the end of the sentence participants judged the sentence acceptability.

Overall, the results indicated that the two learner groups behaved similarly on behavioral measures of comprehension and production, but crucially differed in online processing. All groups, including learners, showed sensitivity to V2-violations in the ERPs. Swedish native speakers were also sensitive to length of prefield showing the typical biphasic ERP response only to violations with long prefields allowing build up of expectations. Importantly, the learners, who did not differ behaviorally, showed different responses. The German learners [+V2] showed similar ERP patterns to native Swedish speakers, whereas the English learners [-V2] showed more variation in their ERP responses. We discuss these findings in terms of theories of crosslinguistic influence and theories of native-like syntacticprocessing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Lund University , 2014. p. 15-15
Keyword [en]
CBL, ERP, syntax, L2
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70872OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70872DiVA, id: diva2:1188738
Conference
Culture, Brain, Learning : Wallenberg Network Initiative, Lund University, nov 19-24, 2014
Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Abstracts

Authority records BETA

Andersson, Annika

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, AnnikaSayehli, SusanGullberg, Marianne
Languages and Literature

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 11 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf