lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A developmental ERP study of nonword rhyming
University of Oregon, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6731-1522
University of Massachusetts, USA. (Neurocognition and Perception Laboratory)
University of Oregon, USA.
University of Oregon, USA. (Brain Development Lab)
2005 (English)In: Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, CNS 2005, Cognitive Neuroscience Society , 2005Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous event-related potential (ERP) research of auditory rhyming showed the classical phonological rhyming effect (N450) to be evident in children as young as 6 years of age (Coch, Grossi, Skendzel & Neville, in press). ERPs to spoken nonwords preceded by nonrhyming nonwords showed increased negativity (400-600ms post-stimulus-onset) in comparison to rhyming targets. This effect was largest at posterior medial sites bilaterally. Thus the previous research suggests that the neurocognitive networks involved in processing auditory rhyme information are comparable to adults by the age of 6. The current study extends this finding to even younger children aged 5 to 7 years who also show typical adult rhyming effects. However, more interestingly, younger children ages 3-4 did not show the same distribution of rhyming effects. A second ERP component commonly reported in rhyming tasks with adults is a slow contingent negative variation (CNV) in response to the first stimulus presented, thought to reflect phonological rehearsal. Unlike the N450 the CNV component has been shown to differ between adults and children age 6 to 8 (Coch et al, 2002; Coch et al, in press). The current study allowed us to address the development of this component at an even earlier age. The data provide further information regarding the development of rhyming skill in young children, thought to be fundamental to the acquisition of reading. Both rhyming and phonological rehearsal effects will be discussed in the frameworks of how phonological processing and awareness impact language and literacy development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cognitive Neuroscience Society , 2005.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70868OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70868DiVA, id: diva2:1188744
Conference
Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, CNS 2005
Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Abstracts

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Annika
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf