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Desirable transport futures
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University;Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0505-9207
University of Surrey, UK.
University of Otago, New Zealand.
Breda University, The Netherlands.
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2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 61, no Part: B, p. 301-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This overview article for the special issue on 'Desirable Transport Futures' sets out with a brief introduction of the current development of the global transport system, suggesting that it remains unclear whether transport systems are heading towards desirable change. This desirability is defined as a reduction in the system's negative externalities, including accidents, congestion, pollutants and/or noise, while retaining its functionality. There is evidence that transport externalities continue to grow with an increasingly mobile and growing global population. Against this background, the article discusses what may constitute more desirable transport futures, as well as the barriers that have to be overcome to move towards such futures. The article concludes that transport governance will be essential to far-reaching change, and that greater focus has to be placed on individual and societal socio-psychological perspectives shaping mobility consumption. Nine papers contained in this special issue provide in-depth analyses of transport systems, as well as insight into how these may be changed in more systemic ways. A concluding research agenda is offered that outlines a number of innovative approaches researchers may pursue as part of further efforts to engender desirable transport futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 61, no Part: B, p. 301-309
Keywords [en]
Barriers, Desirability, Policy, Systemic change, Transport futures, Environmental impact, Mechanical engineering, Public policy, Global population, In-depth analysis, Innovative approaches, Negative externalities, Transportation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72451DOI: 10.1016/j.trd.2018.01.008ISI: 000438003400007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042021653OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-72451DiVA, id: diva2:1196239
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved

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Gössling, Stefan

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