lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Islamic Educational Spaces: Architecture of Madrasah and Muslim Educational Institutions
Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5432-8883
Polytechnic of Milan, Italy.
Islamic Azad University, Iran.
2018 (English)In: Handbook of Islamic Education / [ed] Holger Daun & Reza Arjmand, Cham: Springer, 2018, 1, p. 1-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The mosque (both as masjid or jami’) is recognized as the first Muslim educational space for formal and informal learnings, for children and adult alike. Although the mosque remained as one of the primary centers of Islamic studies in various disciplines to this day, the Muslim cities from the Middle Ages onward have witnessed the emergence of specific institutions for Islamic education. Kuttābs or maktabs were primary education institutions often small scale but, in some instances, housed in a specific building consisted of a large, domed, unadorned hall in which all the pupils sat cross-legged on mattresses in a rough semicircle, usually next to low desks. Such buildings were generally erected by philanthropists and informed by the traditional architecture in form and structure. The first turn in formation of a specific Islamic higher education space was the majid-khan complex in which hujrahs (dormitories) and madras (study spaces) were built adjacent to the mosques. Madrasah buildings were formed in eastern lands of the Muslim World inspired by Khurāsāni vernecular architecture. With the selection of Isfahan as the capital of Ṣafavīd in 1722, the city was labeled Dār al-‘Ilm (The House of Knowledge) and reached fame in the Islamic world for its educational institutions. Among other achievements, Isfahan is credited for the innovation and design of an Islamic educational space. Isfahani architects utilized classic Persian architecture with its internal garden, formerly used extensively in Persian style mosques, to madrasah buildings. The model spread later to most of the Muslim world as the classic model of madrasah building.

The design of the madrasahs like any other architectural structure of the Islamic world was informed by Islamic rules and principles and reflects the social, political, and economic values of the Muslim society. Despite the diversity of the architectural typologies among various Islamic societies, such principles have resulted in formation of common spatial qualities in Islamic educational spaces.

This chapter provides a cross-disciplinary review of the architectural foundations of the Islamic institutions of education. Through a review of various models of madrasaharchitecture in different historical eras, the chapter provides an account on the development, taxonomy, and common characteristics of Islamic educational spaces in various parts of the Muslim world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018, 1. p. 1-43
Series
International Handbooks of Religion and Education, ISSN 1874-0049, E-ISSN 1874-0057 ; 7
Keywords [en]
Islamic education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72921DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-53620-0_54-1ISBN: 978-3-319-64682-4 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-53620-0 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-72921DiVA, id: diva2:1198524
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textChapter on publishers website

Authority records BETA

Arjmand, Reza

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Arjmand, Reza
Educational Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 70 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf