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Islamic Education in Iran
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5432-8883
2018 (English)In: Handbook of Islamic Education / [ed] Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand, Cham: Springer , 2018, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the arrival of Islam in the seventh century, Iran developed as the center for Shī‘ite education, and Iranians contributed significantly to the institutionalization and expansion of Islamic education both in form and content. For centuries, clergies were regarded as the custodians of education running preprimary and primary education in maktabs; postprimary and higher education were carried out and institutionalized in madrasahs.

Iranian madrasah played also a significant role in promoting knowledge and sciences, both religious and nonreligious. With the establishment of Qom theological seminary (ḥawzah ‘ilmīyah Qom), however, Islamic education and its respective institutions (madrasahs) revitalized and started a new era and played a pivotal role in the formation of the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Operating under the institution of waqf and other forms of religious taxes, ḥawzah ‘ilmīyah today is a network of madrasahs and other educational institutions, active both through traditional methods and in the virtual world to foster the Shī‘ite communities worldwide.

The Iranian Revolution of 1979 is considered as one of the instances in running a modern society based on Islam and contributed significantly to the revival of religious ideologies across the world. Iranian theocratic government planned a shift from a Western model of social order and education to a one deeply rooted in Islamic beliefs and values. To achieve the goal to intellectually nurture generations of committed Muslims as the human capital of Muslim ummah, among other measures, a larger proportion of the formal curricula is devoted to education of Islam, while religious education also occupied a significant status both in curricular and extracurricular activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer , 2018, 1.
Series
International Handbooks of Religion and Education, ISSN 1874-0049 ; 7
Keyword [en]
Shī‘ism; Iran; Ḥawzah ‘ilmīyah; Maktab; Madrasah; Islamic education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72930DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-53620-0_40-1ISBN: 978-3-319-64682-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-72930DiVA, id: diva2:1198540
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-04-17

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Publisher's full texthttps://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-319-53620-0_40-2

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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