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Remarks on four novel landfill mining case studies in Estonia and Sweden
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Inst Phys Energet, Latvia.
Estonian Univ Life Sci, Estonia.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8906-9271
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, ISSN 1438-4957, E-ISSN 1611-8227, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 1355-1363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In common sense, a landfill is a place where the life cycle of products ends. Landfill mining (LFM) mostly deals with former dumpsites and derived material may have a significant importance for the circular economy. Deliverables of recently applied LFM projects in Sweden and Estonia have revealed the potential and problems for material recovery. There are 75-100 thousand old landfills and dumps in the Baltic Sea Region, and they pose environmental risks to soil, water and air by pollution released from leachate and greenhouse gas emissions. Excavation of landfills is potential solution for solving these problems, and at the same time, there are perspectives to recover valuable lands and materials, save expenses for final coverage of the landfills and aftercare control. The research project "Closing the Life Cycle of Landfills-Landfill Mining in the Baltic Sea Region for Future" included investigation at four case studies in Estonia and Sweden: Kudjape, Torma, Hogbytorp and Vika landfills. Added value of this research project is characterization of waste fine fraction material, determination of concentration for most critical and rare earth elements. The main results showed that both, coarse and fine, fractions of waste might have certain opportunities of recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. Vol. 20, no 2, p. 1355-1363
Keyword [en]
Landfill mining, Recovery of waste, Metals, Environmental remediation, Circular economy
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73123DOI: 10.1007/s10163-017-0683-4ISI: 000429111800059OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-73123DiVA, id: diva2:1199437
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved

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Hogland, MarikaJani, YahyaKaczala, FabioBurlakovs, JurisHogland, William

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Hogland, MarikaJani, YahyaKaczala, FabioBurlakovs, JurisHogland, William
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