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Living SMART - A randomized controlled trial of a guided online course teaching adults with ADHD or sub-clinical ADHD to use smartphones to structure their everyday life
Karolinska Institutet;Stockholm University.
Karolinska Institutet.
Karolinska Institutet.
Karolinska Institutet.
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2015 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate an online intervention for adults with ADHD that aimed to improve organizational skills and attention with the help of smartphone applications.

Method

Participants (n = 57) were recruited and assessed through questionnaires and telephone interviews. Diagnoses of ADHD were confirmed for 83% of the participants, 5% most probably had the diagnoses, and 12% did not fulfill all diagnostic criteria despite high levels of symptoms. Participants were randomized between the intervention (n = 29) and a wait-list control group (n = 28). The 6-week intervention involved support from a coach in finding a routine for organizing everyday life with the help of smartphone applications. The primary outcome measure was ASRS Inattention. Secondary outcomes were ASRS sub-scale Hyperactivity and measures of depression, anxiety, stress, quality of life and general level of functioning. Blind evaluators also assessed improvement in organization and inattention at post treatment.

Result

The participants receiving the Living Smart course reduced their average scores on ASRS-Inattention from 28.1 (SD = 4.5) to 22.9 (SD = 4.3) which was a significantly larger reduction than found in the control group. 33% of participants were considered clinically significantly improved according to the blind evaluator, compared to 0% in the control group. The same results were found when only participants with a confirmed diagnose were included in the analyses.

Conclusion

Adults with ADHD seem to be able to use smartphone applications to organize their everyday life and can be taught how to do this via online interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 2, no 1, p. 24-31
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73896DOI: 10.1016/j.invent.2014.11.004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-73896DiVA, id: diva2:1203872
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Kaldo, Viktor

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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