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Do psychotherapists with different theoretical orientations stereotype or prejudge each other?
University of Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg.
Karolinska Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6443-5279
2013 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, ISSN 0022-0116, E-ISSN 1573-3564, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 169-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates a possible threat to the progress of psychotherapy. It aims to detect and compare stereotyped or even prejudiced views among psychotherapists of different theoretical orientations, building on social psychological theory of in-groups and out-groups. Swedish psychotherapists (n = 416) of four different orientations (psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioural, or integrative/eclectic) used the valuable elements in psychotherapy questionnaire to rate the importance of various elements in psychotherapy. They also estimated how therapists of other orientations would rate these elements. These estimates were then compared with therapists’ actual self-ratings in order to detect patterns of stereotyping or prejudiced views. Psychotherapists exaggerate the differences between their own and other orientations in a stereotyped way, but correctly predict what members of their own orientation (in-group) find important. However, they overestimate how important ‘orientation-typical features’ are to those of other orientations (out-group), indicating a clear tendency to stereotype. Overall, integrative/eclectic therapists’ estimates were less stereotyped than the estimates of therapists of other orientations. A somewhat unexpected finding was that cognitive and behavioural therapists seem more inclined towards stereotyping. The stereotyped views of other theoretical orientations among psychotherapists can be argued to have negative connotations and may thus be seen as prejudices. These prejudices could create irrational and unnecessary obstacles to the development of both the science and the practice of psychotherapy and signal the need for psychotherapists of all orientations to develop a more balanced picture of each other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013. Vol. 43, no 3, p. 169-178
Keywords [en]
Integrative psychotherapy, Theoretical orientation, Psychotherapist attitudes, Stereotype, Prejudice, In-group out-group
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73932DOI: 10.1007/s10879-013-9231-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-73932DiVA, id: diva2:1203877
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved

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Kaldo, Viktor

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