lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Exercise and internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression: multicentre randomised controlled trial with 12-month follow-up
Karolinska Institutet.
Karolinska Institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6170-8251
Univ Limerick, Ireland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6835-5321
Karolinska Institutet.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 209, no 5, p. 416-422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Evidence-based treatment of depression continues to grow, but successful treatment and maintenance of treatment response remains limited. Aims To compare the effectiveness of exercise, internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and usual care for depression. Method A multicentre, three-group parallel, randomised controlled trial was conducted with assessment at 3 months (post-treatment) and 12 months (primary end-point). Outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. Computer generated allocation was performed externally in blocks of 36 and the ratio of participants per group was 1:1:1. In total, 945 adults with mild to moderate depression aged 18-71 years were recruited from primary healthcare centres located throughout Sweden. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three 12-week interventions: supervised group exercise, clinician-supported ICBT or usual care by a physician. The primary outcome was depression severity assessed by the Montgomery-angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Results The response rate at 12-month follow-up was 84%. Depression severity reduced significantly in all three treatment groups in a quadratic trend over time. Mean differences in MADRS score at 12 months were 12.1 (ICBT), 11.4 (exercise) and 9.7 (usual care). At the primary end-point the group x time interaction was significant for both exercise and ICBT. Effect sizes for both interventions were small to moderate. Conclusions The long-term treatment effects reported here suggest that prescribed exercise and clinician-supported ICBT should be considered for the treatment of mild to moderate depression in adults. (C) The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 209, no 5, p. 416-422
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74021DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.115.177576ISI: 000387934500009PubMedID: 27609813OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-74021DiVA, id: diva2:1204529
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Kaldo, Viktor

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Helgadottir, BjörgHerring, Matthew P.Kaldo, Viktor
In the same journal
British Journal of Psychiatry
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf