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The Influence of Gender Stereotype Consistent and Inconsistent Attributes of Job Applicants on Recruiters’ Memory
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

According to a growing body of research, gender stereotypes can have a profound effect on hiring decisions. However, it is unclear whether information confirming or contradicting gender stereotypes can bias recruiters’ memory and ultimately affect hiring decisions. This study examined whether gender stereotypes about job applicants can affect memory of recruiters to remember stereotype consistent information, specifically when hiring for a predominantly male gender-typed job position as Financial Advisor. In a true experiment, 158 participants screened CVs of fictitious applicants, containing either gender stereotype consistent or inconsistent information in an online hiring scenario conducted mainly through a professional social network site. Recognition of consistent and inconsistent information was measured, as well as the intent to hire and to invite the applicant for a job interview. The results revealed that stereotype consistent information on the CV was not remembered more than stereotype inconsistent information. Additionally, male applicants were not preferred over female applicants in regard to the intent to hire. Female applicants were more likely to be invited for an interview than male applicants, as opposed to our hypothesized presumption. Professional experience in personnel selection did not affect the results. Practical implications are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 24
Keywords [en]
descriptive gender stereotypes, memory, recognition, recruitment, application screening
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-75025DiVA, id: diva2:1213538
Educational program
Psychology, work and organizational psychology, Master Programme, 120 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-08 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf