lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Emotional Intelligence and Job Insecurity: Gender Differences Between Employees
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Emotional intelligence and job insecurity are important to study because they can have an impact both on an individual’s professional and personal life; however, research on emotional intelligence and job insecurity is contradictory. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there were gender differences in emotional intelligence and job insecurity in employees in a Swedish sample. The aim was also to investigate if emotional intelligence moderated gender differences in job insecurity. The sample consisted of 109 employees, with 33 males (30.30%) and 76 females (69.70%), from four different organizations both from public and private sector. The research question was: “Are there differences in emotional intelligence and job insecurity between female and male employees?” Two questionnaires were used: The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF) and The Job Insecurity Measure. Correlation analysis was performed between emotional intelligence and job insecurity and a medium, negative relationship was found. Gender differences in emotional intelligence and job insecurity were tested with independent samples t-tests. The results indicated no gender differences. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed to investigate if emotional intelligence moderated gender differences in job insecurity; however, the results were non-significant. The present study shows that emotional intelligence and job insecurity are negatively correlated, and since job insecurity is regarded as an environmental stressor and part of job stress, the relationship between emotional intelligence and job stress is also confirmed by this negative correlation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 35
Keywords [en]
emotional intelligence, job insecurity, gender differences, employees
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-75049DiVA, id: diva2:1213628
Subject / course
Psychology
Educational program
Psychology, work and organizational psychology, Master Programme, 120 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-11 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Emotional Intelligence and Job Insecurity: Gender Differences Between Employees(419 kB)38 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 419 kBChecksum SHA-512
00475c455ca0ce632414618ef0616a5e60b45044895740d02365b5f30d5a4b8f3d46a5d0bb105095f968b80d3010385d2048b1038e9dfcd303c0b7a435800158
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Palmcrantz, Maria
By organisation
Department of Psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 38 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 486 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf