lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Characterization and modeling of CO2‐water‐rock interactions in Hygiene Sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Denver Basin, aimed for carbon dioxide geological storage
Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
Toho University, Japan.
2018 (English)In: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2152-3878, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 781-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon capture and geological storage are among the most valuable technologies capable of reducing CO2 emissions. Long‐term interactions between CO2 and a reservoir, and the integrity of geological formations, are key factors in the selection of adequate reservoirs for permanent storage. Numerical models of CO2‐water‐rock geochemical interactions are often employed to predict the fate of CO2 stored in a reservoir over time. The Hygiene Sandstone, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, USA, is a geological formation with potential for CO2 storage, and was therefore studied in this work, in which we collected and characterized outcrop samples in order to supply the input parameters for numerical simulations. Four representative thin sections of Hygiene Sandstone outcrops were quantified in terms of detrital constituents, diagenesis, and porosity on the basis of conventional petrography. Sandstone mineralogy included, in decreasing order, quartz, K‐feldspar, muscovite, albite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, poikilotopic calcite, and siderite. Porosity ranged from 4% to 13%. A geochemical modeling study of CO2‐water‐rock interactions performed with two characterized samples and brine data from the Hygiene Sandstones, simulating reservoir conditions, suggested that the mineralogy of the sandstone is quite stable under the conditions that were tested and only minor mineralogical and porosity alterations would occur within a thousand years of storage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018. Vol. 8, no 4, p. 781-795
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75696DOI: 10.1002/ghg.1788ISI: 000440549700012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-75696DiVA, id: diva2:1217153
Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Ketzer, João Marcelo

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ketzer, João Marcelo
By organisation
Department of Biology and Environmental Science
In the same journal
Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 18 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf