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From Europe, to the Agbogbloshie Scrapyard
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The challenge of sound e-waste treatment is something that is a global concern when relating to good business practices, safe working conditions, information security and environment. This research applies a holistic view of the illegal trade of e-waste from Europe to Ghana by aiming to highlight some of its drivers. By applying an adapted RV-model to identify the actors engaged in smuggling and rational choice theory to analyse market incentives this research identifies legal and procedural weaknesses that enable the illegal shipment of e-waste.

The actors identified to target West Africa was in general smaller groups. These groups have established routes and transit points that complicate the international coordination of enforcers and inhibit their capacity to build strong cases against criminals. They target countries within the EU with limited enforcement capacity, high shipping volumes and low penalty rates for environmental crimes to exploit the domestic responsibility of enforcement and sentencing. They also mask e-waste as used electronics which is not heavily regulated and for which there is a strong Ghanaian market demand and employs a large number of workers in the informal sector, with the supply chain with an estimated 200,000 people employed.

The main problems identified was enforcement procedures, international and domestic coordination, relative cost for formal recycling, lack of alternatives for workers and officials as well lack of deterring sentencing. This has led to secondary effects such as poor environmental and health protection as well as physical- and data-security.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 45
Keywords [en]
WEEE, e-waste, trade regulation, EU, Ghana
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-76025DiVA, id: diva2:1219559
Subject / course
Peace and development
Educational program
Peace and Development Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf