lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Social Media as a Crisis Response: How is the water crisis in Cape Town dealt with on Twitter
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In our interconnected world, social media is a vital tool for communication in the everyday life of individuals. The importance of social media in society has increased not only in times of peace, but social media has grown to be instrument of influencing crisis. In recent years, social media’s role in crisis and crisis response was observed by many scholars for different crisis. One of the most recent ones is the water crisis in Cape Town, South Africa, which was chosen as a case study due to its current relevance in the social media landscape. The obviously high use of social in this crisis is what this qualitative desk study investigates. This study does, however, not aim to analyse social media as a solution for a crisis, but sheds light on the patterns of social media behaviour. This research thus aims to understand Why people turn to social media in a crisis? Subsequent to this, this research analyses whether different types of users resort to social media during a crisis for different reasons. The results were obtained through applying a frameworks: As the main tool of analysis, the Different Users and Usage Framework by Houston et al. (2015). Assisting on explaining some specific part of the findings, the Theory of Planned Behavior (Icek Ajzen, 1991) was applied. Three main findings were analysed for the case study: (1) People turn to social media during a crisis for different reasons and in the case of the water crisis in South Africa, fifteen usage areas were observed. (2) According to the analytical results, different users tend to dominate different usage areas and (3) During the Cape Town crisis, it was common practice for businesses and corporations to raise awareness and combine it with promoting their business.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 79
Keywords [en]
Social Media, Crisis Response, Day Zero, Water crisis, Cape Town, South Africa, Theory of Planned Behavior, Twitter Research, Twitter Archivist
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76597OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-76597DiVA, id: diva2:1230004
Educational program
Peace and Development Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(793 kB)15 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 793 kBChecksum SHA-512
813dd92a684253fa8d42a2b9621252317d7776b0d5d2973c5ac2878c3c5f01550179535938d1b0e0db46d6412a186f43a869402a8e232bb008a2a4adaafd2d44
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Social Studies
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 15 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 51 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf