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Media Transformation in Recent British Cinema: Biblical Motifs in Peter Greenaway’s Goltzius and the Pelican Company and Shane Meadows’s Dead Man’s Shoes
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. (LNUC Intermedial and multimodal studies, IMS)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8554-0385
2018 (English)In: Symbiotic Cinema: Confluences between Film and Other Media, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent British cinema has produced films stretching from heritage films to kitchen sink realism. The main differences between these poles lies in the classes described – bourgeoisie and aristocracy in heritage films vs. working class in kitchen sink realism -, and in the mise en scène  – high-quality visual production values for heritage films vs. the simplicity, banality and avoidance of carefully constructed plots or settings for kitchen sink realism. In this paper, I will analyze two films, one from each one of these two categories: Peter Greenaway’s Goltzius and the Pelican Company (2012), representing the heritage tradition, and Shane Meadows’s Dead Man’s Shoes (2004), representing kitchen sink realism. None of the films could be considered as ideal examples of their class though. Greenaway’s film describes an older period than usually do heritage films (the sixteenth century), and does it in ways that combines naturalistic and extremely lavish settings. It can be seen as an example of what Claire Monk (2002) calls ‘post-heritage films’, that is films which adopt a less naturalistic, even anachronistic approach to screening narratives set in the past. Meadows’s film is basically social-realistic, but has a twist which elevates it to a mythical level which is far from typical of kitchen sink realism. One of the things which complicate, in both cases, the classification is the use of biblical motifs. Consequently, I will analyze the use of these based on Lars Elleström’s model of media transformation (2014). A close look on whether certain scenes are to be considered as cases of media transformation or transmediation (Elleström 2014) shows that Greenaway’s film deconstructs the religious motif, whereas Meadows’s film, on the contrary, constructs it in unexpected and subtle ways. In both cases, however, different intermedial strategies are used in sophisticated ways in relation to religious motifs, something that deserves a closer analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2018.
Keywords [en]
Intermediality, Cinema, Bible
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77622OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-77622DiVA, id: diva2:1246636
Conference
Symbiotic Cinema : Confluences between Film and Other Media
Available from: 2018-09-09 Created: 2018-09-09 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved

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Lutas, Liviu

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf