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Impact of late and prolonged working life on subjective health: the Swedish experience
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9801-8433
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics. (Linnaeus University Centre for Discrimination and Integration Studies)
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 1618-7598, E-ISSN 1618-7601, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 389-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the relationship between the prolongation of working life and subjective health. Drawing on a unique combination of longitudinal data and the results of a postal survey in Sweden, we investigate the health consequences of extending working life beyond the normal retirement age of 65. To do this, we compare the health status of two groups of retired people: one group who left the labour market completely at the age of 65, and a second group who remained in employment after the age of 65. Using a standard linear probability model and controlling for a range of socio-economic variables as well as previous labour market experiences, perceived life expectancy, pre-retirement income and health, our estimations show that those continuing to work after 65 on average display a 6.8% higher probability of reporting better health during retirement than those leaving at the age of 65. However, we find that this positive correlation between the extension of working life and health is only transitory. After 6 years of retirement, the health advantage of working after the normal retirement age disappears. Furthermore, we did not find any evidence that working after the age of 65 is positively correlated with physical fitness, self-reported depressive symptoms or well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 20, no 3, p. 389-405
Keywords [en]
Extending working life, Self-assessed health, Retirement, Sweden
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77636DOI: 10.1007/s10198-018-1005-zISI: 000463662800006PubMedID: 30191342Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053458503OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-77636DiVA, id: diva2:1246878
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 2013-0093Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Anxo, DominiqueEricson, ThomasMiao, Chizheng

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