lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Low-frequency impact sound pressure fields in small rooms within lightweight timber buildings - suggestions for simplified measurement procedures
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering. RISE Res Inst Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0019-4568
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4404-5708
2018 (English)In: Noise Control Engineering Journal, ISSN 0736-2501, E-ISSN 2168-8710, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 324-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low-frequency impact sound insulation, down to 20 Hz, has a significant effect on humans' dissatisfaction due to noise in timber buildings. Today, the low-frequency procedure of the ISO 16283-2:2015 impact sound measurement standard covers the frequency range down to 50 Hz for the use of an ISO tapping machine, but does not yet cover the use of an ISO rubber ball. Here, microphone grid measurements were made in two small rooms that were excited by an ISO rubber ball from the rooms above. In each grid, 936 microphone positions were used to capture data representing the full spatial fields of impact sound pressures from 10 to 500 Hz for one excitation location for each room. The data show that the positions at the radiating ceiling surfaces have low maximum sound pressure levels compared to the pressure levels at the floors, especially in the floor corners. First, a measurement procedure to predict the maximum exposure of low-frequency sound in a room is proposed It is suggested that the maximum values for each frequency band in the corners opposite to the partition being excited (i.e., the floor corners) be used. Second, a procedure to predict the room average sound pressure level and the prediction's normal distribution is suggested. Iterative measurements with random microphone locations and random excitation locations are used. The advantage of this method is that the required precision and information about the sensitivity due to different excitation points are obtained. (c) 2018 Institute of Noise Control Engineering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Noise Control Engineering , 2018. Vol. 66, no 4, p. 324-339
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77898DOI: 10.3397/1/376628ISI: 000444002100004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052959047OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-77898DiVA, id: diva2:1249753
Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Olsson, JörgenLinderholt, Andreas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Olsson, JörgenLinderholt, Andreas
By organisation
Department of Mechanical Engineering
In the same journal
Noise Control Engineering Journal
Mechanical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 230 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf