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Where is ‘the political’ in curriculum research?
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice. (Studies of Curriculum, Teaching and Evaluation (SITE))ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5554-6041
2018 (English)In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 711-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As an overview in connection with the 50th anniversary of the Journal ofCurriculum Studies (JCS), this article begins with John Dewey’s notion thatall educational actions carry philosophical implications. The tensionbetween different education-research philosophies, between non-socialand social education philosophies in Dewey’s terms, becomes visible inan overview of articles published during the past 50 years of the JCS.Therefore, the purpose here is to explore in what different forms and inwhat different spaces the political takes shape in curriculum research.Policies on education always address fundamental political questions inthe sense that debates on education inevitably include alternative viewsof good education and good society. Instead of looking for the political,it seems to be more fruitful to look for different ways of expressing thepolitical. This, in turn, might contribute to a more nuanced debate onwhich political perspectives will be most productive in developing thecurriculum research field. Three views on ‘the political’ are identified. Thefirst is a personal, ‘over-socialized’ view based on personal experiences,the second is a ‘social’ view that focuses on social interactions andsocietal implications, and the third is an impersonal, ‘under-socialized’view based on ‘science’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. Vol. 50, no 6, p. 711-723
Keywords [en]
Virtual special issue; curriculum research; philosophy of education; political positions; moral consequences
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79340DOI: 10.1080/00220272.2018.1537375ISI: 000452858200005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056141171OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-79340DiVA, id: diva2:1274747
Available from: 2019-01-02 Created: 2019-01-02 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Wahlström, Ninni

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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