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Training models and status of clinical neuropsychologists in Europe: Results of a survey on 30 countries
Univ Helsinki, Finland.
Hosp Sisters Char, Austria.
Univ Porto, Porto, Portugal.
Univ Nicosia, Cyprus.
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Neuropsychologist (Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition: Section D), ISSN 1385-4046, E-ISSN 1744-4144, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 32-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aims of the study were to analyze the current European situation of specialist education and training within clinical neuropsychology, and the legal and professional status of clinical neuropsychologists in different European countries. Method: An online survey was prepared in 2016 by a Task Force established by the European Federation of Psychological Associations, and representatives of 30 countries gave their responses. Response rate was 76%. Results: Only three countries were reported to regulate the title of clinical neuropsychologist as well as the education and practice of clinical neuropsychologists by law. The most common university degree required to practice clinical neuropsychology was the master's degree; a doctoral degree was required in two countries. The length of the specialist education after the master's degree varied between 12 and 60 months. In one third of the countries, no commonly agreed upon model for specialist education existed. A more systematic training model and a longer duration of training were associated with independence in the work of clinical neuropsychologists. Conclusions: As legal regulation is mostly absent and training models differ, those actively practicing clinical neuropsychology in Europe have a very heterogeneous educational background and skill level. There is a need for a European standardization of specialist training in clinical neuropsychology. Guiding principles for establishing the common core requirements are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 33, no 1, p. 32-56
Keywords [en]
Clinical neuropsychology, specialist education, training, legal regulation, Europe
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80956DOI: 10.1080/13854046.2018.1484169ISI: 000458320100003PubMedID: 29923448Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048818475OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-80956DiVA, id: diva2:1293505
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Bengt A.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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