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Seniors' self-preservation by maintaining established self and defying deterioration - A grounded theory.
Halmstad University, Sweden.
Halmstad University, Sweden.
Örebro University, Sweden.
Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, p. 1-9, article id 30265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to understand how seniors who are living independently resolve issues influenced by visual impairment and high fall risk. We interviewed and observed 13 seniors with visual impairment in their homes. We also interviewed six visual instructors with experience from many hundreds of relevant incidents from the same group of seniors. We found that the seniors are resolving their main concern of "remaining themselves as who they used to be" by self-preservation. Within this category, the strategies maintaining the established self and defying deterioration emerged as the most prominent in our data. The theme maintaining the established self is mostly guided by change inertia and includes living the past (retaining past activities, reminiscing, and keeping the home intact) and facading (hiding impairment, leading to avoidance of becoming a burden and to risk juggling). Defying deterioration is a proactive scheme and involves moving (by exercising, adapting activities, using walking aids, driving), adapting (by finding new ways), and networking by sustaining old support networks or finding new networks. Self-preservation is generic human behavior and modifying this theory to other fields may therefore be worthwhile. In addition, health care providers may have use for the theory in fall preventive planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 11, p. 1-9, article id 30265
Keywords [en]
Elderly, fall risk, grounded theory, living independently, self-preservation, seniors, visual impairment
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Medicine, Gerontology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81324DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v11.30265PubMedID: 27172511OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-81324DiVA, id: diva2:1298975
Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved

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Thulesius, Hans

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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