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The development of new sport-specific response time tests: validity, reliability, and functionality
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9554-1234
University of Tasmania, Australia.
University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
University of Split, Croatia.
2019 (English)In: 16th Annual Scientifi Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy “Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives”: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Bjelica, D., Popovic, S., Akpinar, S., Podgorica, Montenegro: University of Montenegro , 2019, Vol. 16, p. 27-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Response time (RT) has been defi ned as the time needed for a person to perceive and respondto some external stimulus (Schmidt et al., 2018). Defi ned in such a way, we can say that RT iscritical characteristic in athlete performance, especially in rapid-action sports where athletes need to reactquickly and accurately in various sporting situations in response to game-specifi c clues (e.g., movementof the ball, opponent player, etc.) (Pojskic et al., 2018; Sekulic et al., 2014). However, there is an evidentlack of reliable and valid sport-specifi c measurement tools applicable in the evaluation of RT in trainedathletes. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the validity, reliability, and functionality of four newlydeveloped RT testing protocols among athletes from agility-saturated (AG) and non-agility-saturated(NAG) sports. Methods: Thirty-seven AG and ten NAG athletes (age: 20.1 ± 2.8; eleven females) volunteeredto undergo three randomized simple response time (SRT) protocols that included a single limbmovement and one complex response time (CRT) protocol that included multi joint movements andwhole body transition over a short distance (1.5 and 1.8m). Each RT test involved 3 trials with 5 randomizedattempts per trial. Two sensors were placed at the left- and right-hand side for SRT-1 and SRT-2.Three sensors were positioned (left, middle, right) in SRT-3 and CRT. Results: The results showed thenewly developed tests were more reliable and functional in the AG athletes. The RT of AG athletes wasfaster than that of NAG athletes in the CRT test from the left (p = 0.00, d = 2.40), center (p = 0.00, d =1.57), and right sensor (p = 0.00, d = 1.93) locations. In contrast, there were no differences between thegroups in the SRT tests, which indicated that they can be used independently of the sport affi liation. Discussion:The weak correlation between the SRT and CRT tests suggests that response time of the singlelimb and multipoint limb movements should not be considered as a single motor capacity. This studydetermined that AG athletes were more capable of dealing with complex response tasks than their NAGpeers. Such enhanced ability to rapidly and accurately reprogram complex motor tasks can be consideredone of the essential qualities required for advanced performance in agility-based sports. Therefore,coaches who work with fi eld-sports athletes should be aware that development of rapid response time incomplex motor tasks is mostly dependent on the training of neuromotor coordination (i.e., specifi c motorprofi ciency). This means that, in designing training programs, special attention should be focused onproper learning of various sport-related motor programs (i.e., playing technique) that once learned canbe rapidly retrieved from neuromotor memory and formatted as an effi cient motor response. References:Pojskic et al. (2018). Front Physiol 9. Schmidt et al. (2018). Motor Control and Learning, Human Kinetics.Sekulic et al. (2014). J Strength Cond Res 28.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Podgorica, Montenegro: University of Montenegro , 2019. Vol. 16, p. 27-
Series
Annual Scientific Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy: “Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives”, ISSN 2536-5398, E-ISSN 2536-5401
Keywords [en]
reaction time, neuromotor coordination, agility, team sports, basketball
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81340OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-81340DiVA, id: diva2:1299238
Conference
16th Annual Scientific Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy, "Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives", 4-7 April 2019, Cavtat, Dubrovnik, Croatia
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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