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Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure Proxy-estimated by Sky View Fish-eye Photography-Potentials and Limitations from an Exploratory Correlation Study
Swedish Radiat Safety Author, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3030-6716
Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, ISSN 0031-8655, E-ISSN 1751-1097, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 656-661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Potentials and limitations of sky view fish-eye photography and calculation of the percentage of free sky (sky view factor, SVF) as a proxy to estimate solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in shade settings are investigated using controlled situations. SVF and measured solar UVR exposure correlated at high mid-latitude (56.65 degrees N) near autumnal equinox in September. The correlation was enhanced by splitting the sky view images into a south- and a north-half and weighting the south-half higher to account for the direct sun. Sky view images from eight different settings with SVF-values 98.3% - 14.9% were compared to exposure measurements by polysulphone film dosimeter badges in the horizontal zenith-, vertical-south-, east-, west- and north-directions and their combinations. The sky view images were un-split and un-weighted or split and the semi-skies given south/north weights (3.0/1.0) or a higher weight ratio (3.5/0.5). Of all tested combinations split sky view SVFs weighted 3.0/1.0 and compared to horizontal (zenith-oriented) dosimeters yielded the highest correlation (R-2 = 0.96). The weight ratio (3.5/0.5) yielded the 2(nd) highest correlation (R-2 = 0.90) both compared to measured horizontal exposure and compared to the horizontal exposure averaged with the vertical-south-oriented exposure. SVF from sky view fish-eye photography may estimate solar UVR exposure in shade settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019. Vol. 95, no 2, p. 656-661
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81405DOI: 10.1111/php.13027ISI: 000461381600022PubMedID: 30267571Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056733173OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-81405DiVA, id: diva2:1300765
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Pagels, Peter

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