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Energy Availability in Athletics: Health, Performance, and Physique
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8249-1311
Australian Institute of Sport, Australia;Australian Catholic University; Australia.
Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, USA.
McMaster University, Canada;IOC Medical Commission-Games Group.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, ISSN 1526-484X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 152-164Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The reported prevalence of low energy availability (LEA) in female and male track and field athletes is between 18% and 58% with the highest prevalence among athletes in endurance and jump events. In male athletes, LEA may result in reduced testosterone levels and libido along with impaired training capacity. In female track and field athletes, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea as consequence of LEA has been reported among 60% of elite middle- and long-distance athletes and 23% among elite sprinters. Health concerns with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea include impaired bone health, elevated risk for bone stress injury, and cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, LEA negatively affects recovery, muscle mass, neuromuscular function, and increases the risk of injuries and illness that may affect performance negatively. LEA in track and field athletes may occur due to intentional alterations in body mass or body composition, appetite changes, time constraints, or disordered eating behavior. Long-term LEA causes metabolic and physiological adaptations to prevent further weight loss, and athletes may therefore be weight stable yet have impaired physiological function secondary to LEA. Achieving or maintaining a lower body mass or fat levels through long-term LEA may therefore result in impaired health and performance as proposed in the Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport model. Preventive educational programs and screening to identify athletes with LEA are important for early intervention to prevent long-term secondary health consequences. Treatment for athletes is primarily to increase energy availability and often requires a team approach including a sport physician, sports dietitian, physiologist, and psychologist.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2019. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 152-164
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81735DOI: 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0201PubMedID: 30632422OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-81735DiVA, id: diva2:1303010
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Melin, Anna K.

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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