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Class, Commerce and the Bard: The Migration of Shakespeare into Sweden, 1770 – 1820
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2469-6431
2019 (English)In: ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association: Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

If anything, the migration of Shakespeare into Sweden was complex and fraught with uncertainties. The scant existing documentation of performances in the 18thcentury indicates that the introduction of Shakespeare often took the route via French or German translations, although in some cases there are clear indications that English was the source language. Gothenburg, on the west coast of Sweden, had lively contacts with Great Britain and it was also here that for example Hamlet was staged the first time. Notably, Shakespeare was not performed in the capital of Stockholm until the 1810s: it was theatres in provincial towns like Gothenburg and Norrköping that introduced Shakespeare, in various versions, to the Swedish stage. In the light of this historical development, the present paper argues that the migration of Shakespeare into the country was strongly linked to the rise of a wealthy provincial bourgeoisie, often with economic connections in England and Scotland. Once Shakespeare begun to be staged in the capital, it was for different reasons, involving the rise of literary Romanticism, and from the horizon of a Europe that had been affected by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. Thus, the paper concludes, the early history of Shakespeare in Sweden was not so much the result of national projects or specific agendas as the consequence of an emerging class restructuring and economic interests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Shakespeare, migration, theatre history, eighteenth-century studies, history of Shakespeare in Sweden, history of Shakespeare in Scandinavia
National Category
Specific Languages General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87921OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-87921DiVA, id: diva2:1342259
Conference
ESRA Conference, European Shakespeare Research Association. Shakespeare and European Geographies: Centralities and Elsewheres. Rome 9-12 July 2019
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved

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Sivefors, Per

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf