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Microstructure and compressive strength of gypsum-bonded composites with papers, paperboards and Tetra Pak recycled materials
Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6909-2025
Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Wood Science, ISSN 1435-0211, E-ISSN 1611-4663, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The incorporation of recycled papers, paperboards and Tetra Pak as filling materials in brittle matrices presents aninteresting approach in the utilization of waste materials for building construction. This paper examines the compressivestrength and microstructure of gypsum-bonded wastepaper-based composites. Recycled wastepaper of varioustypes (office paper, magazine paper and newspaper), cardboards, paper boxes and Tetra Pak were shredded to shortlength strips of about 4 × 18 mm. The shredded materials were used as filling materials in natural gypsum in a ratioof 1:3 (v/v), and water was added to the mix. The paste was formed in cylindrical samples measuring 10 cm in lengthand 5 cm in diameter. Seven different types of composites were produced depending on the material used. Thecomposite products with newspaper and magazine paper had significantly lower density and compressive strength(p < 0.05) than the others. However, the differences were small to have any practical importance. The density valuesranged between 1.26 and 1.34 g/cm3, and compressive strength was the lowest (4.48 N/mm2) in the gypsum–magazinepaper composites and the highest (6.46 N/mm2) in the gypsum–Tetra Pak I composites. Since the samplesproduced in this study exhibited adequate compressive strength, the products could be suitable for such applicationsas interior walls in building constructions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the fractured surfacesrevealed needle-like structures of gypsite crystals surrounding the fibers, which indicates good adhesion between thehydrophobic matrix and lignocellulosic fibers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 65, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 42
National Category
Wood Science Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Forestry and Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89175DOI: 10.1186/s10086-019-1821-5ISI: 000483579900001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-89175DiVA, id: diva2:1352125
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 942-2016-2Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-21The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20160052The Kamprad Family Foundation, 2017-19Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved

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Adamopoulos, StergiosAmiandamhen, Stephen

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