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The Demand for Sexual Services: and its Effects on the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in Sweden
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Human trafficking is a global problem that has an effect on international, national and local contexts. Every year, hundreds if women are being transported to Sweden for the purpose of sexual exploitation. The international document by the UN, the Palermo Protocol, establishes a distinct concept of human trafficking and calls on all member states to contribute with an effective counteraction to the problem. However, the demand for prostitution as a cause of the prevalence of human trafficking or how the counteraction is supposed to be conducted is not mentioned in the protocol. 

 

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate and explain the connection between prostitution and human trafficking for the purpose of sexual exploitation in Sweden with a focus on the demand, investigate who stands behind the demand and reasons for the purchases of sexual services along with distinguishing what measures are advocated for to decrease the demand for prostitution in the country. The thesis is conducted through collected material from various relevant governmental organisations concerned with the issue, while the analytical framework is built upon approaches of abolitionism and regulation. 

 

The demand is considered to be the very cornerstone to the prevalence of prostitution which in itself is claimed to be, if not caused by human trafficking, the very expression of violence and inequality. Many sex purchasers distinguish prostitution from human trafficking, expressing their certainty of being able to identify when they meet someone who is subjected to trafficking – in reality it was found that they are not aware of the indicators of trafficking which is close to invisible. Resources needs to be targeted towards the concerned authorities and the education and awareness needs to be enhance both within authorities but also in the general public. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 41
Keywords [en]
Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Forced Prostitution, Sex Purchase Act, Demand
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89176OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-89176DiVA, id: diva2:1352185
Subject / course
Peace and development
Educational program
Peace and Development Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf