lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Quasispecies dynamics and molecular evolution of human norovirus capsid P region during chronic infection
University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3841-4826
Show others and affiliations
2009 (English)In: Journal of General Virology, ISSN 0022-1317, E-ISSN 1465-2099, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this novel study, we have for the first time identified evolutionarily conserved capsid residues in an individual chronically infected with norovirus (GGII.3). From 2000 to 2003, a total of 147 P1-1 and P2 capsid sequences were sequenced and investigated for evolutionarily conserved and functionally important residues by the evolutionary trace (ET) algorithm. The ET algorithm revealed more absolutely conserved residues (ACR) in the P1-1 domain (47/53, 88 %) as compared with the P2 domain (86/133, 64 %). The capsid P1-1 and P2 domains evolved in time-dependent manner, with a distinct break point observed between autumn/winter of year 2000 (isolates P1, P3 and P5) and spring to autumn of year 2001 (isolates P11, P13 and P15), which presumably coincided with a change of clinical symptoms. Furthermore, the ET analysis revealed a similar receptor-binding pattern as reported for Norwalk and VA387 strains, with the CS-4 and CS-5 patch (Norwalk strain) including residues 329 and 377 and residues 306 and 310, respectively, all being ACR in all partitions. Most interesting was that residues 343, 344, 345, 374, 390 and 391 of the proposed receptor A and B trisaccharide binding site (VA387 strain) within the P2 domain remained ACR in all partitions, presumably because there was no selective advantage to alter the histo blood group antigens (HBGA) receptor binding specificity. In conclusion, this study provides novel insights to the evolutionary process of norovirus during chronic infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 90, no 2, p. 432-441
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Virology; Natural Science, Microbiology; Natural Science, Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-1887DOI: 10.1099/vir.0.005082-0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-1887DiVA, id: diva2:308935
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Lindberg, A. Michael

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindberg, A. Michael
By organisation
School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of General Virology
Microbiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 122 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf