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Wage Effects of Search Methods for Immigrants and Natives – The Case of Sweden
University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
2006 (English)In: European Society for Population Economics - ESPE, Verona, Italien, 2006Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Using unique cross-section survey data collected in 1998 and 2003, this

study examines whether successful job-search methods differ between natives and

immigrants, and whether there is a wage difference between the two groups

associated with the search method used.

It is found that the direct method is the successful search method for about 1/3

of the sample. However, informal methods are even more often the successful one

for natives while formal methods are so for immigrants. About forty percent of

natives and twenty percent of immigrants find their job using informal methods.

This holds for both men and women.

Next, a wage analysis has been performed, which shows that there is a

positive return from gaining the job by informal compared to formal search

methods for native men. For immigrant men the corresponding return is of the

same size, but with opposite sign. No such difference is found for women. A

similar return as for the informal method is found for the direct method, which

implies the similarity of the informal and direct method in the Swedish context.

Also, when pooling the data for immigrant and native men the smallest immigrant

wage discount is found when getting the job by the formal search method, being

half the size compared to the discount for other methods of search.

Hence, the results indicate inferior networks of immigrant men, which support

the argument to increase job search through formal methods, such as public

employment agencies, and to use specially designed “immigrant-coaches” in this

process. However, to what extent these results are due to selection into job search

methods is yet unclear.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Verona, Italien, 2006.
Keyword [en]
Job search, Immigrants, Wage differences
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-4883OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-4883DiVA: diva2:314768
Conference
XX Annual Conference of European Society for Population Economics (ESPE) June 22-24, 2006 - Verona, Italy
Note
Nummer: Available from: 2010-04-28 Created: 2010-04-28 Last updated: 2011-09-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf